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June 24
IV 35    vicaranasamadhigatatma dipako manasyalam parigalite vadharadhih, vilokayan ksayabhavanirasa gatir gatajvaro vilasati dehapattane (69)
Vasistha continued:
O Rama, the mind itself is the jiva; the mind experiences what it itself has projected out of itself.
By that it is bound.
It is the state of the mind that determines the nature of the re-incarnation of the jiva.
One who wishes to be a king dreams that he has become king.
What one intensely wishes for he obtains sooner or later.
If the mind is impure, its effects are also impure; if it is pure, its products are pure too.
The noble man engages himself in noble spiritual pursuits even in straitened circumstances.
There is neither bondage nor liberation in truth.
The infinite thinks 'I am the body' and this thought acts as bondage.
When one realises that all these are false, he shines as the infinite consciousness.
When the mind has been purified by pure thoughts and actions, it takes on the nature of the infinite, even as a pure cloth takes on a colour easily.
When in a pure mind there arise concepts and notions of a body, scriptural knowledge and dispassion, etc., the world-appearance comes into being.
When the mind gets involved in the external objective universe it moves away from the self.
But, when the mind gives up the subject-object relationship it has with the world, it is instantly absorbed in the infinite.
The mind has no existence apart from the infinite consciousness: it did not exist in the beginning, it will not exist in the end and so it does not now!
One who thinks that it does exist holds sorrow in his hand.
He who knows that this world is the self in reality goes beyond that sorrow, and this world gives him both joy and liberation.
The mind is naught but ideas and notions: who will grieve when such a mind comes to an end!
The reality is consciousness which is the middle, between the seer and the object; this reality is veiled by the mind and revealed when the mind ceases.
When the mind's conditioning ceases, then ignorance, craving, desires and aversions, delusion, stupidity, fear and ideations come to an end; purity, auspiciousness and goodness arise.
One enjoys the delight of self-knowledge.
He who has an intelligence that has been rendered pure by the destruction of all inner impurities, has his heart illumined by the light of the self obtained through enquiry into the self; seeing the worthlessness of birth and death, he dwells without fear or anxiety in the city which is the body.
1998 - 2017
[The Supreme Yoga - a new translation of the Yoga Vasistha ] [ Swami Venkatesananda ] ( 2nd ed. 1991 - 2 vol ) - published by The Divine Life Society - Himalayas, India

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